(LitCrit)Thompson, Terry W. "**Miller's //Death of a Salesman//**." Explicator 60.3 (Spring 2002): 162-163. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 179. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.
In the critical essay of “Miller’s Death of a Salesman,” presented by Terry W. Thompson, he interprets Willy Loman’s ignorance as a person. As the first act progressed, Willy Loman, seen in a flashback, is talking to his two sons, Biff and Happy. During this time Thompson points out that Willy Loman compares his sons to Adonises,” the handsomest of all Greek males”, unaware of Adonis’s tragic ending. The irony of Loman’s allusion is that they were like Adonis in the way that they both believed that “physical attractiveness “and “superficial charm” could take them through life, but in reality they remain in their parents’ house now as grown men in their thirties; all though they did not die, they spent their early lives passing opportunities, compromising their “youthful promise”. Thompson’s objective analyzes of Willy Loman’s comparison to the Greek demi-god, proved as a useful source to show how Loman’s ignorance eventually led to his downfall as a salesman. From this essay, one could see how Loman’s downfall wasn’t just misfortune, but was an act of his on stupidity.

(LitCrit)Ribkoff, Fred. "**Shame, Guilt, Empathy, and the Search for Identity in Arthur Miller's //Death of a Salesman//**." Modern Drama 43.1 (Spring 2000): 48-55. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 179. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 16 Feb. 2011

In Ribkoff’s critical essay, “Shame, Guilt, Empathy, and the Search for Identity in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman,” he addresses the issue of self-identification and how shame, guilt, and empathy all impact ones personal emotions. As an example of shame and guilt, he used Biff during his confrontation with his father; also while he was stealing Bill Oliver’s fountain pin. Biff’s empathy was a result of returning to his parent’s home as a grown, showing his inability to survive on his own. Willy Loman’s shame can be seen throughout the story but especially when he constantly tries to cover up his “sense of failure” to Ben and his family. I believe the purpose of Ribkoff’s objective essay, was to show how the past experiences can mold a person’s future; Biff once again being the prime example. Willy Loman installed his failure as a salesman into Biff and Happy at early age which is seen early in the book, but the chooses made by Biff, such as stealing for his father, can be derived from their close yet rough relationship. It’s not till Biff finally confronts Willy where he final finds himself. This essay changed the way I perceived of Willy Loman as a father figure; placed in the situation of depression as a salesman, he could have been more sensible.

(LitCrit)Murphy, Brenda. "**Willy Loman: Icon of Business Culture**." Michigan Quarterly Review 37.4 (Fall 1998): 755-766. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 179. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 21 Feb. 2011.
In Branda Murphy’s critical essay of Arthur Miller’s, Death of Salesman, entitled “Willy Loman: Icon of Business Culture”; she addressed the fact that Miller wrongfully used Willy Loman’s downfall as an interpretation of the “human crises in the twenty century.” This biased piece written by Murphy, who was the teacher of a student whose father was an actual salesman, related her student’s relationship with their father to that of Willy and Biff. The student was so inspired by Biff’s confrontation with Willy that he confronted his father in the same fashion. The purpose of Murphy’s essay was to convey the human nature of competition of the twenties and forties, and how it affected the future generations. From Loman’s failure and ultimate demise as a salesman, those later generations of businessmen in the 1960’s were caught in the publics’ opinion of a salesman, taken from Death of a Salesman, but yet those businessmen still had to compete with one another and while creating a new identity, different from the one people were use to; showing how one man’s tragic story can relate to other in a culture.